Park Avenue Historic District, photo submitted 1997. Park Avenue Historic District, photo submitted 1997. Park Avenue Historic District, photo submitted 1997. Park Avenue Historic District, photo submitted 1997. Park Avenue Historic District, photo submitted 1997. Park Avenue Historic District, photo submitted 1997. Park Avenue Historic District, photo submitted 1997.
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Park Avenue Historic District
2333Park Avenue, Detroit - Wayne County
2323Park Avenue, - Undef County
2233Park Avenue, - Undef County
2209Park Avenue, - Undef County
113Fisher Freeway, - Undef County
119Fisher Freeway, - Undef County
Property Type district
Historic Use COMMERCE/TRADE/business
COMMERCE/TRADE/department store
COMMERCE/TRADE/organizational
COMMERCE/TRADE/restaurant
DOMESTIC/hotel
DOMESTIC/multiple dwelling
SOCIAL/clubhouse
Current Use COMMERCE/TRADE/department store
DOMESTIC/multiple dwelling
GOVERNMENT/correctional facility
VACANT/NOT IN USE
Style Commercial Style
Italian Renaissance
Late Victorian
Narrative Description The Park Avenue Historic District comprises a collection of late nineteenth and early twentieth century buildings remaining from the period when the street was Detroit's most fashionable residential and business address. The street is also important as one of the original avenues platted as part of the Woodward city plan.
Statement of Significance During Park Avenue's 1920s heyday, Detroiters very consciously looked on the street as the city's version of New York's Fifth Avenue. Members of the Park Avenue Association, formed in 1923, envisioned the south end of Park Avenue as a "high-grade" shopping district, with commercial and office space concentrated at the south end and residential development at the north end. The bottom fell out from under Park Avenue and the rest of the city at the onset of the Great Depression. The street recovered, though with a different atmosphere, during the 1940s and 1950s. An industrial use was added to the mix that was Park Avenue's urbanism when the Iodent Chemical Co. began manufacturing toothpaste and other toiletries in the former Wormer & Moore Building. With the postwar suburban exodus, hastened after the 1967 riot, Park Avenue fell into a more permanent decline. During the early 1970s, another group of Park Avenue property owners organized, this time with a plan to revive the street. Urban designers Michael and Susan Southworth were retained to formulate an urban design plan for the street. Unfortunately, plans for Park Avenue were eclipsed by the construction of the Renaissance Center.
Period of Significance 1905-1930
Registry Type(s) 05/13/1997 National Register listed
04/18/1996 State Register listed
Site ID# P2965